We all knew it would happen but when it finally came to pass the grief was still very profound.

Angus Cross, our Alumni Association’s founder, webmaster and newsletter editor passed away on June 12 at the age of 76. Heartfelt condolences go out to Joanne and family from myself and the rest of the Association’s board of directors. We will all miss his dedication, hard work, wisdom and humour that have kept us going these many years. If it had not been for Angus I doubt that our Association would exist.

The idea for creating a formal, permanent Association came about after the two very successful reunions that were held in 1995 and 2005. At their wrap-up meeting, the 2005 organizing committee adopted an idea put forward by Angus and embarked on a journey that culminated with the formation of the Association. It didn’t happen overnight – Industry Canada issued letters patent on May 14, 2007 followed by Quebec on August 24, 2007, granting the Association official status as a non-profit corporation.

Angus developed the initial website, almost singlehandedly, and took on the role of webmaster. He built up the membership using contact information gathered from reunion attendees and created the newsletter to make sure we kept in touch with and informed the members of upcoming events and subjects of interest.  He promoted our 2010 and 2015 reunions and many smaller local Alumni gatherings.

When the website needed updating, Angus was again heavily involved, along with John Charlton (Class of 1973) and when new the site was installed he again took on the webmaster duties. Working on the newsletter, website and for the Association were his passion.

In late 2018 the Alumni Association directors received an email from Angus advising us of his medical condition. He had stage four lung cancer and would soon be undergoing intensive chemotherapy. He asked that the directors find a new Newsletter editor and webmaster as he felt that he would be unable to handle the work.

I agreed to take over some of his duties with his help whenever he could give it and with technical support from John Charlton.  I was hopeful that his treatments would be successful and that we would assume his old roles and even talked to him about it. In early March of this year Angus told me it would not happen. He knew it was just a matter of time.

Angus we owe you a huge debt of gratitude - you have done so much. You will be missed by all but rest assured you will be fondly remembered.

On a brighter note, Robert Wrigley, Class of 1961, has written a new book, “Chasing Nature: An Ecologist's Lifetime of Adventures and Observations”, that will be released this fall. He has graciously offered to provide excerpts from the book over the next few months with the first two installments appearing in July.  Dr. Wrigley has written several other books and, if you haven’t already done so, I urge you to go to the website and read his Who’s Who profile. It is a fascinating account about a St. Lambert Alumnus who grew up on the corner of Logan and Maple during the 50’s and 60’s.

James Mayhew, Class of 1963 sent me an article about a new commemorative coin produced by the Canadian Mint marking the 60th anniversary of the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway. The obverse side of the coin shows a ship entering the St. Lambert locks with a view of the Montreal skyline in the background. Although there is very little reference to St. Lambert, I’ve included the article because the impact of the Seaway on our city was immense.

Thanks to Alan Hemmings, Class of 1974, for the old photos that he inherited from his mother, Dorothy Gill. I’m too young (ha) to recognize anyone in the pictures but perhaps some of you will see a familiar face or two.

I have also found a few more subscribers who have not been receiving the newsletter. I've added you to our mailing list, however, if for some reason you do not want to receive the publication, just let me know and I'll remove your name.

Finally, I hate repeating myself, but would you please send me articles and/or photos that would be of interest to our members. We need content. And Jim Baxter keep the jokes coming.

Harvey Carter

Life Member - C'60 - Editor, Alumni Connection

Welcome New and Renewing Alumni Association Members

Renewed Membership
Gerrie Millington (Cobb)
Class of 1959
From Stittsville, ON

Renewed Membership
Rob Holmes
Class of 1967
From Edmonton, AB

Expiring Memberships

Please renew now.

Memberships expiring in July

Phillippa Settels 1988

Memberships expiring in August

John Wayman  1974
Shirley Smith  1970
Gail Lee  1970
Eric Ponting  1974

New Found Subscribers

Hooray!

Karen Pedersen-Bayus
Kate Church
Laurie Bean
Leslie Chisholm
Marjorie McKeown
Paul Tatham
Susan Nickerson

Penny Newberry
Peter Spearman
Ron Scott
Ruth Kelly
Steven Sharp
Steve Kelly

ALUMNI COMMENTS

Robert Wrigley - Class of 1961  Excerpts from his upcoming book.

Chasing Nature: An Ecologist's Lifetime of Adventures and Observations

A FIRST NATURE LESSON
I have often wondered when experiences in the early years of a child’s life are first recorded as permanent memories in the rapidly developing brain.  Did they really happen, have they been altered by time, or are they completely fictitious, assembled by the brain from subsequent events? As a young child at my home in Buenos Aires, Argentina, I have a vivid image of watching a plane drone slowly across my range of vision from one side of the baby carriage to the other; highly unlikely to have registered in my brain, but possibly an early cue of a desire to travel? A few reliable memories do stand out distinctly when I was three or four. I remember my siblings and I being warned by our parents to stay clear of the colourful caterpillars feeding on plants in the garden because they were covered in stinging hairs.

In the backyard of our family’s home stood a small apple tree, which produced that year just one apple.  I must have watched that apple countless times over the spring and summer, as it slowly enlarged and turned from lime green to rosy red. My mother and father must have tired of my frequent question -- “Can we eat it now?” (in Spanish). Then one evening, when my father came home from work, my question was answered with the long-awaited; “yes!” With the anticipation of opening a gift under a Christmas tree, my sister Jean, brother John and I watched intently as our father reached up and plucked the beautiful fruit from the branch. With his pocket knife he cut the apple into three pieces so that we could enjoy tasting it at the same time, but something unexpected happened -- out wriggled several white grubs, suddenly exposed from their sweet, dark home. I just stood there in disbelief, not knowing how to react to such a shocking conclusion to my long waiting period.  I looked up at my father and asked how did the worms get into my apple?  My parents must have chuckled and then departed into the house for supper, but the incident left a lasting impression in my young mind -- Nature is full of surprise

CLIMBING HIGH
Trees have always fascinated me. As a child standing at the base of each one, I wondered how old it was and whether I could climb it. I remember feeling a wonderful sense of achievement and security while hidden in the leafy branches, safe from detection by all other grounded creatures and people below.  I recall hugging the trunk of a favourite tree, at a height of many metres, with my eyes closed, experiencing it sway gently back and forth in the wind; I was as close as possible to being one with Nature

Robert, sister Jean and mother Eva enjoying the pigeons in a Buenos Aires park, 1945.

As a child in Buenos Aires, my mother frequently took my sister and me for walks in the parks near our home.  I’d spy prickly, green chestnut-tree husks hanging from the outer branches, and I just had to have one.  Climbing much higher than I should have, my mother lost sight of me for a few minutes, and became alarmed at my disappearance.  It was a time (mid-1940s) when the kidnapping of children in Argentina was not uncommon, and were sent to live with well-to-do couples that were unable to have children of their own.  It did not help relieve my mother’s distress when she had been told by gypsies more than once that she should keep a close eye on my sister and me.  My mom called out to me, and I answered from high up in the chestnut tree; “Here’s me!” In later years in St. Lambert, Quebec, my friends and I played the age-old game of swinging chestnuts on a string to see who could crack each other’s favourite nut.  To this day, I cannot resist opening up the thick green husks to reveal the shiny, brown “thnethnuts” -- the closest I could come as a child to pronouncing the word chestnut. Over the next few years, I spent an inordinate amount of time perched contently in trees, observing birds and squirrels, pondering ideas, and occasionally, mischievously, dropping little pebbles on startled passers-bye.

I feel certain that children of our early ancestors felt the same attraction to trees, after all, climbing comes so naturally to our youth, and we did descend from arboreal members of our primate family tree.  Trees provided a regular supply of nutritious foods, a refuge from ground-dwelling predators, a leafy bed, a means of healthy exercise, and later, a source of fibre, tools and fuel for fire.  When I examine the exquisite design of my long arms and grasping hands, I thank trees for helping to direct the evolution of these adaptive features.  I am able to type these words on my computer due in part to our close ancestral association with trees.  They really deserve our admiration and respect in so many ways -- magically capturing energy from the sun to support a myriad of life, generating oxygen, sequestering carbon dioxide, providing most of our fruit and nuts, generating an almost endless supply of fibre for building materials, and producing rich sources of fossil hydrocarbons from their decomposed remains.  They are an integral component of most of the world’s ecosystems and the home where most species live. While species of Australopithecus and Homo moved toward an upright stance on two legs, other characteristics still reveal a close association with climbing. In the modern world, witnessing an adult person in a tree seems so bizarre; we have come down from our cradle in the canopy.

2019 Alumni Bursary Winners

Marie- Claire Beauchenes and Jonathan Bell were double award winners. In addition to receiving receiving the traditional Alumni Bursary, Marie Claire won the award for the 2019 Outstanding Girl and Jonathan for the 2019 Outstanding Boy. Caleb Blanchard, Jeremy Morin and Giuliano Germile received traditional Alumni Bursaries.

Marie-Claire Beauchenes
Marie-Claire Beauchenes

Jonathan Bell
Jonathan Bell

Caleb Blanchard
Caleb Blanchard

Jeremy Morin
Jeremy Morin

Giuliano Germile
Giuliano Germile

St. Lawrence Seaway

I recognize the positive economic impact the Seaway has had for both Canada and the United States, but it came with a price. As someone who grew up in St. Lambert during the 40's and 50's, the river was an important part of our experience. We had a beach on the river where I learned to swim, we fished at numerous spots along the St. Lambert shoreline, swam or boated to Moffat's Island or otherwise enjoyed the water. The Seaway took away St. Lambert's  access to the river, to be replaced by Seaway Park and a six lane highway. I can't imagine how Riverside Drive property owners felt - I know I wasn't happy.  And lets not forget the adverse environmental impact including, habitat destruction and the introduction of a host of non-native species to the river system and great lakes. You can't walk more than a few feet on great lake beaches without encountering lots of zebra mussels shells. Anyway, here is the coin showing the St. Lambert lock and if you want to spend a few of your hard earned bucks there may be a few left.

2 oz. Pure Silver Coin - 60 Years of Prominence: The St. Lawrence Seaway - Mintage: 2,000 (2019)
A first! A corrugated-edged 2 oz. coin!

Its waters serve as the economic lifeblood for two nations. Its channels and locks connect North America's heartland to the Atlantic Ocean—and the world beyond. In 1959, the newly completed St. Lawrence Seaway was hailed as one of the greatest engineering feats of the 20th century. Its canals and lock systems transformed a centuries-old trade route into a crucial commercial artery for the modern age. Over the last 20 years, the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation improved lock operations by developing and implementing a Hands-Free Mooring system, and converting the locks to remote control operation. These are the most significant changes since the Seaway's construction—innovations that have increased efficiency and safety while making the waterway more competitive than ever. Today, the Seaway is an important shipping route for two nations, as well as a beloved destination for recreational boaters. About 40 million metric tons of vital cargoes transit the Seaway's locks each year.

Join us in commemorating the 60th anniversary of the St. Lawrence Seaway with a pure silver coin that is anything but conventional. While the view inside a lock highlights the waterway's legacy, the anchor-chain rim symbolizes longevity and gives your coin its never-before-seen shape—a fitting tribute to an innovative and ever-evolving marvel.

"The St. Lawrence Seaway is a vital waterway, serving as a key part of the North American logistics chain and as an important gateway for trade with over 50 nations across the globe. Moving cargo over water supports an immense number of jobs, eases congestion on our road and rail links, and provides the most energy efficient means of getting tonnage to its destination. Stakeholders win on all counts!" Terence Bowles, President and CEO of The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation

Diplomacy. Innovation. Lifeline. Celebrate the 60th anniversary of the St. Lawrence Seaway! Order your coin today!

Special features:

  • A FIRST! A CORRUGATED-EDGED 2 OZ. COIN!The anchor-chain rim on your coin is a marine-inspired twist on traditional denticles. This corrugated-edged 2 oz. coin (a first) is made possible by the creative application of newer technology that has never been used on a coin this size (50 mm)—until now!
  • A LOVE LETTER TO A SYMBOL OF INNOVATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL DIPLOMACY!Your pure silver coin commemorates the 60th anniversary of the St. Lawrence Seaway with a bold design that pays tribute to a vital waterway—one that connects the continent's interior to the Atlantic Ocean.
  • PROVIDES A WATER-LEVEL VIEW!The art provides a water-level view of the St. Lawrence Seaway, where a ship moves through one of the 15 lock systems.
  • INCLUDES THE SYMBOLS OF TWO COUNTRIES THAT SHARE ONE RESOURCE!A split maple leaf and star represents the Seaway as a binational partnership between Canada and the United States.
  • A NOD TO THE CITIES AND LANDSCAPES…The picturesque Seaway is part of the Great Lakes Waterway that flows past some of our largest population centres, which are represented by the Montreal skyline in the background.
  • …AND TO THE PEOPLE!The anchor is a special tribute to all who oversee the safe and efficient passage of marine traffic through our waters.
  • SERIALIZED CERTIFICATE!Your coin includes a serialized certificate!
  • TWO OUNCES PURE SILVER!Your coin is crafted from two ounces of 99.99% pure silver.

Design:
Designed by Claire Watson, your coin is a stylized, symbolic celebration of the St. Lawrence Seaway on its 60th anniversary. It features a head-on view of an eastbound bulk carrier (laker) transiting through the St. Lambert lock, where the Montréal skyline is visible in the distance. A split maple leaf and star represents a binational partnership between Canada and the United States. A symbol of strength and longevity, an anchor chain forms the rim like corrugated denticles and gives the coin its unusual shape. The reverse includes the words "THE ST. LAWRENCE SEAWAY" and "LA VOIE MARITIME DU SAINT-LAURENT" on a scroll banner that also bears a stylized anchor. The obverse features the effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II by Susanna Blunt.

"My initial design was much simpler. I wasn't aware of the process or how detailed the art could be when translating to engraving. My biggest challenge was creating a technical design centred on man-made structures, versus the more organic, nature-inspired subject matter I'm used to working with. It was great for me to step out of my comfort zone and try something new." Claire Watson, Artist

"The shaped, engraved rim sets this coin apart by providing an additional canvas for engraving that matches the nautical theme of the coin." Howard Lam, Engraver, Royal Canadian Mint

Did you know…
It is the heart of a 3,700 kilometre-long corridor that connects the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean.

  • Stretching from Montréal to Lake Ontario, the St. Lawrence Seaway officially includes 13 Canadian and 2 American locks. Together, these lock systems can raise ships that are over two football fields in length more than 168 metres above sea level—about the height of a 60-story building.
  • The St. Lawrence Seaway has a big economic impact.
    It supports nearly 93,000 jobs (including 59,800 in Canada) and generates more than $16.8 billion in economic activity within North America. When combined with the Great Lakes and lower St. Lawrence River, the entire Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Waterway (from Lake Superior to the Atlantic Ocean) supports over 328,500 jobs in North America and generates $59.2 billion.
  • Almost 3 billion tonnes of cargo valued at over $400 billion have sailed through the Seaway's locks since 1959.
    In a typical year, about 25% of all Seaway traffic is international. Grain and iron ore each represent about 25% of Seaway tonnage, with other dry bulk cargoes (i.e. potash and road salt) contributing another 25%. The balance consists of breakbulk shipments (i.e. steel ingots), project cargo (i.e. wind turbine blades) and liquid bulk (i.e. refined fuel products).
  • A single ship can transport up to 30,000 tonnes of cargo—the equivalent of 964 truckloads and 301 rail cars.
    Maritime transport has the smallest carbon footprint compared to trucking and rail transport, and ships have better fuel efficiency overall: one tonne of cargo can travel 243 km on a single litre of fuel. New regulations in 2006 have also reduced the risk of aquatic invasive species, while a joint inspection program ensures compliance with updated safety and environmental standards.

Photos from Alan Hemmings - Class of 1974

These photos belonged to the Alan's mother, Dorthy Gill (Hemmings) and cover the period of Grade 1 (1937) to Grade 11 ( !947)

Class Contacts Needed

If you are interested in representing your class year as Class Contact. Please contact Harvey Carter

Obituaries

Angus Stewart Cross

Class of 1960

It is with great sadness that the Cross family wishes to announce that Angus passed away Wednesday, June 12, 2019 in the Palliative Care Unit at the VG Site, QEII, in Halifax. Angus was born in St. Stephen, N.B., on August 31, 1942 to parents Jean and Fergus. Survived by siblings, Ian (Donna), Duncan (Debbie), Alex (Sharon) and Andrea (Lars). He married his high school sweetheart, Joanne, and together they raised Wendy (Ken) Gillespie and Paul (Young Ae) Cross. He was also extremely proud of being "Boppa" and ""Grampa" to Matthew, Leah and Fiona. His love of the ocean was evident by his career as a young man in the navy, his career in the family businesses, Gabriel Aero Marine and Cross Shipyard and Marina, and enjoyed sailing in several Marblehead to Halifax ocean races. He also made many friends during his career with the Carroll car dealerships. Gus enjoyed his days coaching hockey and baseball. Those who knew Angus knew his greatest time spent was with Jo on the deck enjoying a cocktail, doing crosswords, and looking at the harbour activity in the basin. He is much loved and will be greatly missed. We are grateful for being in his life and the time we had together. In accordance with his wishes, the family plans to scatter his ashes on the sea later this year. They are hosting an informal open house for family and friends today, Saturday, June 15th, from 3-5 p.m. at the family home. Those wishing to send online condolences can do so via email to: bluenoseangus@gmail.com

Link to The Chronicle Herald Obituary.

Dave Coll

Class of 1950

COLL, Dr. David C. Professor Emeritus, Systems and Computer Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, died September 6, 2018 peacefully in his sleep at the age of 85. Dave was born June 17, 1933 in Montreal to Clarence Coll and Lillian (Jones) Coll. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Margaret Jean (Duhan) Coll; and his children Barbie and husband John; Eric and husband Eric; and daughter Nancy Catherine; and his four grandchildren James, Liliane, Margot and Adrien. Dr. Coll graduated from McGill University with Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Engineering Physics, studied Information Theory at MIT, and was awarded the first Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Carleton University. Dr. Coll will be remembered by thousands of Carleton Engineering students, whom he taught during his 40 years at Carleton, for his renowned skills as a teacher and for his sense of humour. He was a pioneer in researching what we know today as video conferencing and distance learning over the Internet, and was instrumental in starting the Communications Engineering program at Carleton where he served as Chair 1975-78 and 1988-89. Among the many awards and recognitions for his contribution to Engineering and society, he was most proud of being named a Life Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Dave will also be remembered by many on Black Donald Lake where he built his beloved cottage and spent most summers on Coll Island.

Published on September 15, 2018

Editor's note: Dave passed away last year, however, we did not find out about his death until this June when his daughter wrote to me about the death of her mother, Margaret (Duhan) Coll. As it happens I knew both Dave and Margaret. The Duhan's lived on Mercille Ave. where I grew up and Margaret was, at times, our babysitter.

Margaret (Duhan) Coll

Class of 1952

Margaret Jean Coll passed away peacefully surrounded by her children on June 4, 2019 at the age of 85.

Marg was full of energy and boundless optimism throughout her life, making friends and joining interest groups - and often ending up running them. Starting with the MIT Dames in Cambridge MA in the late 1950s and continuing with the Faculty Wives Association at Carleton University, she parlayed her experience organizing events into her company Conference Coll Inc., one of the largest conference management companies in Ottawa. Her daughter Nancy Catherine was blessed to learn and work with her for years.

Born Margaret Jean Duhan in Biggleswade, England October 26 1933, she was brought to Canada at the age of 2, and grew up in Saint-Lambert QC, where she met her future husband David Coll at the age of 11, and started going steady at the age of 13, resulting in a relationship and marriage that lasted over 70 years.

Calling herself "the perfect incubator", she was the proud mother of three: Barbara, Eric and Nancy. Marg was also passionate about women's rights, participating in the women's liberation and bra-burning movements of the early 1970s.

Coming from a humble background, she made many of the clothes she wore. Perhaps the most memorable was a beautiful dress she made out of curtains for Barbara's wedding to John Sebes in California. Marg's enthusiasm for life was reflected in her wardrobe of bright red, her bright yellow car, and her fearlessness in standing up to speak in front of large audiences, including, memorably, to the delegates at a large conference on telecom to ask if anyone had a job for her newly-graduated son, leading to a R&D position at Bell Labs for Eric a few weeks later; and getting up to the microphone to tell everyone at Barbara's wedding that her dog Bogie had eaten part of the wedding cake, but she was able to cover it up so it was OK.

Dogs were always a big part of Marg's life, beginning with Sheba, then Boon, Glory, Cala and Bogie, Amy, and her dear companion in her final year, Teddie. She proudly wore a T-shirt that claimed "my entire life is devoted to the care and feeding of my dogs", which was not far off the mark in her later years.

Marg was generous with her time, volunteering for and often becoming president or chair of a number of organizations: MIT Dames; Carleton University Faculty Wives; Protestant Children's Village of Ottawa-Carleton; Meeting Professionals International; Chimo Park Cottagers' Association; City of Ottawa Senior Citizens Advisory Committee; Serenity Renewal for Families; Sunday school at St. Michael and All Angels church; Ottawa Life Long Learning for Older Adults; Interval House; Ottawa Chapter, LEAF; Ottawa Tourism and Convention Authority and the Variety Club.

She is survived by sisters Kathleen Mary Elcox and Barbara Ann Maguire; daughter Barbara; son Eric; daughter Nancy Catherine; and four grandchildren James, Liliane, Margot and Adrien.

Marg will be laid to rest in the fall, alongside Dave and their beloved dogs at Coll Island on Black Donald Lake near Calabogie, where they spent many wonderful summers. Though she lived a long and happy life, she is sorely missed and will be forever loved.

In lieu of flowers, donations to the Ottawa Humane Society are welcome.

Grace Saddler (Poulton)

Class of 1942

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Grace Margaret Saddler (nee Poulton) on May 29, 2019 from Alzheimer’s disease at the Margaret Bahen Hospice, Newmarket with her daughters at her side.

Grace was born September 20, 1925 in St. Lambert. The daughter of Daisy Evans and George Poulton, she was predeceased by her three older brothers Harry, Frank and Richard and by her loving husband Albert Ernest (Ernie) Saddler in 2017. She is survived by her three daughters, Carol, Donna and Janet, son-in-law, Alan Owler and grandson, Colin.

We would like to thank Nichelle Stewart for her loving care of Grace over the last eight years, the staff at the Sunrise Residence in Aurora, the amazing medical team at Southlake Hospital in Newmarket who treated her over the last few years and the outstanding end-of-life care at the Margaret Bahen Hospice. Grace and Ernie met while working at IBM in Montreal, fell madly in love and were married in 1948. They spent their entire married life in St. Lambert until Ernie’s Alzheimer’s disease made it necessary to separate them after 60 years of marriage.

Her daughters could not have asked for a happier home, blessed with parents who were a loving team.

Grace was a tireless knitter, seamstress and gardener. She was a wonderful mother, wife and friend. She generously gave her time to supporting the Ladies Hospital Auxiliary and St. Lambert Legion – Branch 68. Grace loved nothing better than dancing with Ernie and we know they are once again dancing in each other’s arms.

Please remember, people with Alzheimer’s should not be ignored and will thrive with your continued love and attention.

And Finally...

A Coach's Dilemma

The coach called one of his 9-year-old baseball players aside and asked, "Do you understand what co-operation is? What a team is?" "Yes, coach", replied the boy.... "Do you understand that what matters is we win or lose as a team?" The boy nodded in yes. The coach continued, "I'm sure you know, when an out is called, you shouldn't argue, curse, attack the umpire, or call him a pecker-head, jerk-face or a-hole. Do you understand all that?" Again, the boy nodded yes. And when I take you out of the game so that another boy gets a chance to play, it's not good sportsmanship to call your coach a dumb ass or s***head is it?" "No, coach. "Good," said the coach, "Now go over there and explain all that to your Grandmother"!

Some Island Facts

Older Women!

>> SHE WALKED UP AND TIED HER OLD MULE TO THE HITCHING POST. AS SHE STOOD THERE, BRUSHING SOME OF THE DUST FROM HER FACE AND CLOTHES, A YOUNG GUNSLINGER STEPPED OUT OF THE SALOON WITH A GUN IN ONE HAND AND A BOTTLE OF WHISKEY IN THE OTHER.  THE YOUNG GUNSLINGER LOOKED AT THE OLD WOMAN AND LAUGHED, "HEY OLD WOMAN, HAVE YOU EVER DANCED?">> 
>> 
>> THE OLDER WOMAN LOOKED UP AT THE GUNSLINGER AND SAID, "NO, I NEVER DID DANCE... NEVER REALLY WANTED TO.">> 
>> 
>> A CROWD HAD GATHERED AS THE GUNSLINGER GRINNED AND SAID, "WELL, YOU OLD BAG, YOU'RE GONNA DANCE NOW," AND STARTED SHOOTING AT THE OLD WOMAN'S FEET.>> 
>> 
>> THE OLD WOMAN PROSPECTOR -- NOT WANTING TO GET HER TOE BLOWN OFF -- STARTED HOPPING AROUND.  EVERYBODY WAS LAUGHING.  WHEN HIS LAST BULLET HAD BEEN FIRED, THE YOUNG GUNSLINGER, STILL LAUGHING, HOLSTERED HIS GUN AND TURNED AROUND TO GO BACK INTO THE SALOON.>> 
>> 
>> THE OLDER WOMAN TURNED TO HER PACK MULE, PULLED OUT A DOUBLE-BARRELED SHOTGUN, AND COCKED BOTH HAMMERS.
>> THE LOUD CLICKS CARRIED CLEARLY THROUGH THE DESERT AIR. THE CROWD STOPPED LAUGHING IMMEDIATELY.>> 
>> 
>> THE YOUNG GUNSLINGER HEARD THE SOUNDS, TOO, AND HE TURNED AROUND VERY SLOWLY.  THE SILENCE WAS ALMOST DEAFENING.  THE CROWD WATCHED AS THE YOUNG GUNMAN STARED AT THE OLDER WOMAN AND THE LARGE GAPING HOLES OF THOSE TWIN BARRELS. THE BARRELS OF THE SHOTGUN NEVER WAVERED IN THE OLDER WOMAN'S HANDS, AS SHE QUIETLY SAID, "SON, HAVE YOU EVER KISSED A MULE'S BUTT?">> 
>> 
>> THE GUNSLINGER SWALLOWED HARD AND SAID,
>> "NO M'AM... BUT... I'VE ALWAYS WANTED TO.">> 
>> 
>> THERE ARE A FEW  IMPORTANT LESSONS HERE
>> FOR ALL OF US:
>> 
>> 
>> 1 - Never be arrogant.
>> 2 - Don't waste ammunition.
>> 3 - Whiskey makes you think you're smarter than you are.
>> 4 - Always, always make sure you know who has the power.
>> 5 - Don't mess with older women.  They
>> didn't get old by being stupid...